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Australia’s worst breeds for dog attacks revealed

A list of the top ten most dangerous dog breeds in Australia has been revealed with one of the country’s most popular canines in the top three.

A new report from Sydney Children’s Hospital (SCH) has revealed that a child is admitted to a NSW hospital every week to be treated for a dog bite.

The data took into account 628 patients who presented with dog-related injuries between 2010 and 2020 and found that their average age was just five years.

The report also listed the top ten breeds involved in the attacks, with Labradors, believed to be a tolerant breed, accounting for 8.5 percent of the incidents.

Australia’s ten most dangerous dog breeds have been revealed with one of the country’s most popular canines in the top three (Pitbull stock image pictured)

Labradors, believed to be a calm breed, accounted for 8.5 percent of incidents involving a child admitted to hospital after a dog attack.

Labradors, believed to be a calm breed, accounted for 8.5 percent of incidents involving a child admitted to hospital after a dog attack.

The breeds involved in the most reported attacks were Pit Bulls (10.3%), followed by Labradors (8.5%) and Rottweilers (6.8%).

The top three were followed by Bulldog (6%), Border Collie (6%), Jack Russell (5.1%), Terrier (other) (5.1%), Kelpie (5.1%), German Shepherd ( 4.3%) and others (42.7%).

In NSW, from January 1 to March 31 there were 1,027 reported dog bites and 69 canines euthanized.

THE WORST BREEDS FOR DOG BITES BY % OF REPORTED CASES:

1. pitbull 10.3%

2. Labradors 8.5%

3. Rotweiler 6.8%

4. Bulldog 6%

5. Border Collie 6%

6. Jack Russell 5.1%

7. Terrier (other) 5.1%

8. Kelpie 5.1%

9. German Shepherd 4.3%

10. Others 42.7%

The disturbing data comes just days after a heroic grandmother saved her little granddaughter from being savagely attacked by the family’s two dogs.

The canines attacked the girl as she was being fed in the backyard of her grandparents’ home in Springwater Place, Algester, in south Brisbane on Thursday.

Dina Puc, 63, threw herself between the dogs and the toddler, causing the two canines to continue attacking her.

Ms Puc is now said to be in serious condition and will undergo further surgery after doctors battled to save her life on Friday.

The boy, aged about three, suffered serious injuries to his face, neck and chest and required many stitches.

Their breed is not yet known, but a neighbor reported seeing the family walking two ‘very large dogs’ that he believed were mastiffs and were as tall as their owner’s waist.

The dogs have since been seized by Brisbane City Council rangers and are now impounded pending a decision on their future.

The attack comes just months after five-year-old Manny Everleigh was attacked by an English bull terrier/American bulldog mix on Christmas Eve 2021.

The boy had been swimming in a pool at a house where his family was sitting in Varsity Lakes when the attack occurred and paramedics gave him an emergency blood transfusion at the scene.

Manny was rushed to the hospital for an operation after suffering bites to his neck and back, but sadly he could not be saved.

His grandmother, who desperately tried to save him, also suffered injuries to her arm, and the council confirmed that the dog responsible had been euthanized.

The girl, aged around three, suffered serious injuries to her face, neck and chest that required many stitches after two dogs pounced on her at her home in Algester, south Brisbane.

The girl, aged around three, suffered serious injuries to her face, neck and chest that required many stitches after two dogs pounced on her at her home in Algester, south Brisbane.

Rottweilers accounted for 6.8% of attacks that landed NSW children in hospitals during the 2010s to 2020s

Rottweilers accounted for 6.8% of attacks that landed NSW children in hospitals during the 2010s to 2020s

Two-year-old Talan Peters was killed by his family’s dog after he wandered into the backyard unseen by his mother in February.

The boy was savagely attacked by the animal and suffered serious head injuries in the attack at his Mena Creek home near Innisfail, 100km south of Cairns in Queensland.

He was airlifted to Townsville, but later died in hospital when his vital organs failed while he was in an induced coma following brain surgery.

The rise in dog attacks has prompted experts to call for a new campaign to teach parents about pet safety.

Since the attacks, there have been renewed calls for regulations on owning dangerous breeds of dogs to be enforced.

“There needs to be a discussion or consultation on how to handle the breeding, rearing and training of powerful breed dogs,” one vet, who wishes to remain anonymous, told Daily Mail Australia.

A spike in dog attacks has prompted experts to call for a new campaign teaching pet safety (shown here is a bulldog, a breed that accounted for six percent of dog attacks in a new report)

A spike in dog attacks has prompted experts to call for a new campaign teaching pet safety (shown here is a bulldog, a breed that accounted for six percent of dog attacks in a new report)

In Australia today, anyone can own and breed any type of dog without restriction, regardless of physical strength and with any level of dog-owning experience, from being a first-time pet owner to an accomplished owner who has had dogs all his life. ‘

He welcomed the changes to dog ownership laws introduced in Queensland in January, but also warned that the law could go too far in some cases.

The law change will make it mandatory for regulated dogs, including restricted breeds, declared dangerous dogs and threatening dogs, to wear a distinctive red and yellow collar with reflective stripes.

In NSW, the state government introduced annual permits for owners of restricted breeds of dogs and dogs declared dangerous in July 2020.

Owners of these breeds have to pay a $195 annual permit in addition to their one-time lifetime pet registration fee, which costs about $66.

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